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Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal - Secrets

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Click here to go see the bonus panel!

Hovertext:
Maybe we can fix conspiracies with The Blockchain.


Today's News:
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dukeofwulf
10 days ago
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1000x THIS.
ChrisDL
8 days ago
this has been my main argument to my crazy uncle for the past 8 years.
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jlvanderzwan
9 days ago
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Keeping a secret is more like radioactive decay: any given day there's a chance a person keeping it will spill it.

The Moon Is Flipped Upside Down in the Southern Hemisphere

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How old were you when you learned that the Moon in the Southern Hemisphere is upside down? I was today years old…this is my head exploding —> %@*&!$. Ok, the Moon isn’t upside down (that’s Northern-ist) but its orientation changes depending on if you’re north or south of the equator.

Moon Flipped

“From our perspective, the Moon and the night sky is actually rotated 180 degrees compared to our Northern Hemispherical friends,” Jake Clark, an astronomer from the University of Southern Queensland in Australia, explained to ScienceAlert.

“In the south we see the Moon’s dark ‘Oceanus Procellarum’ sea in the south-east corner compared to in the north-west corner for a northern observer.”

But why does it look like this? Well, because physically, we’re actually upside down compared to someone standing in the opposite hemisphere.

That makes perfect sense & the explanation is quite simple but it’s still messing with my head. How did I not know this? Here’s how the Moon appears in the Northern Hemisphere (from Wikipedia):

Moon Flipped North

And here’s a photo from Brendan Keene in Australia:

Moon Flipped South

Tags: Earth   Moon   space
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dukeofwulf
18 days ago
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Explain that, Flat Earthers.
popular
18 days ago
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llucax
16 days ago
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And how does it looks from the equator? Why people is always discriminating Ecuadorians?
Berlin
StunGod
16 days ago
I think that as you get closer to the equator, the moon takes a more elevated path across the sky. The farther north or south you travel, the lower in the sky the Moon is, since it orbits over the equator. I'm at about 45 degrees north, so there's always a "top" and "bottom" to the moon because it never goes right overhead. It moves sideways in an arc in the southern sky. At the equator, it still moves sideways, but goes directly overhead so there's no strong visual indication of what pole is top or bottom.
roblatham
17 days ago
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How have I never considered this before?
mareino
18 days ago
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HOW FAST DO I HAVE TO FLY TO SEE IT FLIP
Washington, District of Columbia
StunGod
18 days ago
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Yep, I'm in this camp too. Today years old, just learning this incredibly obvious thing.
Portland, Oregon, USA, Earth
iwhitney
20 days ago
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What? I was In Australia and I did not know this.
Minneapolis, MN
deezil
20 days ago
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I TOO WAS TODAY YEARS OLD.
Louisville, Kentucky

chemicallywrit: kaylapocalypse: historicaltimes: “Crazy...

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chemicallywrit:

kaylapocalypse:

historicaltimes:

“Crazy Dion” Diamond at one of his sit-ins as a teenager in Arlington, VA. June 10, 1960

via reddit

All of those people around him are demons

hey guys! here’s some fun things i learned from this article about Dion Diamond:

  • he did these sit-ins by himself. like idk about you, but i always thought of sit-ins as organized by groups, what kind of bravery does it take, man
  • he didn’t tell anyone about it, like he was no glory-seeker about this. his parents didn’t even know until reporters started calling them up like “hey, did you know your son is in jail?
  • when someone called the cops he’d skedaddle out the back door although he was sent to prison multiple times
  • the last time he got arrested was in Baton Rouge, and the cops were so sick of him that they told inmates they’d put in a good word for anyone who gave Diamond a hard time. (the inmates didn’t take the bait.)
  • he’s still alive!

hark, a hero of our times!

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dukeofwulf
61 days ago
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popular
62 days ago
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rocketo
62 days ago
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👏🏾👏🏾👏🏾👏🏾👏🏾👏🏾👏🏾
seattle, wa

Local News Anchors Now Have to Read Pro-Trump Propaganda

jwz
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Every news station under Sinclair's umbrella is required to syndicate commentary that comports with its owners' ideological views.

When Trump took office, Sinclair was on the cusp of purchasing Tribune media, a merger that would give the firm ownership of enough local stations to reach 70 percent of U.S. homes. But there were two obstacles to such a deal: Federal rules put a cap on the number of local news stations any single entity could own, and also prohibited any company from owning a newspaper and television station in the same media market. Taking on Tribune's assets would put Sinclair in violation of both those laws.

But by the end of Trump's first year in office, his appointees to the Federal Communications Commission had abolished both of those regulations. [...]

Now, Sinclair is taking its "covert state media" game to new, Orwellian heights: By the end of this month, Sinclair will require all of its local news anchors to condemn "national media outlets" for publishing "fake stories" and "using their platforms to push their own personal bias," according to internal documents obtained by CNN. Those documents instruct local news directors to air these criticisms of "biased and false news" -- criticisms that, of course, echo the president's own -- over and over again, so as "to create maximum reach and frequency."

Sinclair's new media-bashing promos rankle local anchors:

The instructions to local stations say that the promos "should play using news time, not commercial time." Like the Epshteyn commentaries, this takes away from local news time.

"Please produce the attached scripts exactly as they are written," the instructions say. "This copy has been thoroughly tested and speaks to our Journalistic Responsibility as advocates to seek the truth on behalf of the audience."

The promos begin with one or two anchors introducing themselves and saying "I'm [we are] extremely proud of the quality, balanced journalism that [proper news brand name of local station] produces. But I'm [we are] concerned about the troubling trend of irresponsible, one sided news stories plaguing our country."

Then the media bashing begins.

Previously, previously, previously, previously, previously.

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dukeofwulf
274 days ago
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The John Oliver story on Sinclair is a great briefing on this not-great company, if you missed it. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GvtNyOzGogc
popular
274 days ago
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JimB
274 days ago
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Scary power misuse.
jhamill
276 days ago
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Wow, this is horrible.
California

Here's a Novel Idea: Hold Both Caller and Police Officer Responsible for Deadly 'Swatting'

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Tyler BarrissA Los Angeles man has been arrested for telling police a hostage situation was underway at a home in Wichita, Kansas. His claim was a lie, and the police fatally shot a man in the ensuing raid.

Tyler Barriss, 25, is accused of calling city hall in Wichita claiming that a shooting and hostage situation were unfolding at a local home. Barriss apparently was attempting a "swatting" prank on somebody he was having an argument with online over the video game Call of Duty.

"Swatting" pranks are nasty stunts where a caller draws a SWAT team out to an innocent party's home by calling the authorities and pretending a dangerous crimeis taking place there. They've grown increasingly popular over the past few years as a way of frightening or getting revenge on somebody.

Barriss was not having a dispute with Andrew Finch, 28, a father of two in Wichita, nor anybody else at the address he sent police to. The person Barriss was arguing with had given him a fake address. A SWAT team showed up at Finch's door, and when he went outside to see what was going on, a police officer shot and killed him.

This appears to be the first time somebody has been killed by a swatting prank, though people have previously been shot and injured. Barriss has a criminal background and was previously arrested for calling in phony bomb threats to ABC Studios in Los Angeles.

An example of how pioneering this case is: Right now the police and prosecutors don't seem able to tell the media what Barriss is actually being charged with. He's being held on a felony warrant without a bond, but the charges might not be revealed until his first court appearance this week.

The case has unfortunately quickly and predictably turned into a "Who's to blame?" question. It's literally in the headline of New York Times' coverage of Finch's death: "Fatal 'Swatting' Episode in Kansas Raises Quandary: Who Is to Blame?" Is it Barriss, who fabricated a crime? Or is it the officer, who shot an unarmed, innocent man?

This is a false dilemma. Both are to blame.

If Barriss is indeed the man who called the police, he is responsible for sending a group of armed people into an environment where they believed violence was happening and innocent lives were at stake. Now, what that looks like in terms of holding Barriss criminally responsible is a complicated and challenging problem. Libertarian lawyer Ken "Popehat" White has suggested rewriting laws to make swatting somebody a felony. Read his explanation here.

But that doesn't mean the officer who shot Finch behaved appropriately. It's frustrating and depressing to see that, even when the police know they made a very serious mistake, they are circling the wagons. From The New York Times:

Chief Livingston said Mr. Finch, who was unarmed and apparently not the intended target of the online prank, did not immediately comply with officers' commands and moved his hands to his waistline, leading one officer to fear he had drawn a weapon.

That's right—they went straight to the well-worn "The officer thought he was reaching for a weapon" defense even though we all know by now that he was just some random guy. Finch's mom says the police never announced themselves. Finch had no way of knowing that he was in danger of getting shot. And yet police are instinctively trying to pin the mistake on Finch.

The Times notes that laws typically allow officers to shoot people when they "reasonably believe" they are in danger. This has created an environment where police officers are incentivized to exaggerate a sense of danger because it will allow them an excuse for mistakes and even for reckless behavior.

Livingston's responses to the shooting are very much a concern, because they don't suggest that he sees any sort of problems in the way his police responded to this call. In the Times piece, University of Kansas Law Professor Jean Phillips even suggests that Livingston's insistence on defending the cop could actually undermine efforts to hold Barriss responsible for Finch's death. If Finch's shooting is deemed "justifiable," what is the extent that Barress could be held criminally liable?

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dukeofwulf
340 days ago
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Hypothetical: Someone shoves a pedestrian into traffic, and the oncoming car has plenty of room to stop, but they accelerate instead, killing the pedestrian. Is the shover a murderer, or the driver? Yes. Yes.
popular
340 days ago
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sirshannon
341 days ago
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Yep.

Real Estate

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I tried converting the prices into pizzas, to put it in more familiar terms, and it just became a hard-to-think-about number of pizzas.
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dukeofwulf
442 days ago
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The US national debt is 61k per citizen, 167k per taxpayer. Hopefully those numbers are more relatable. The government is racking up a credit card on our behalf, and our descendants will get the bill. http://www.usdebtclock.org/
kbenson
442 days ago
Debt to assets or net worth might of the country be a more intuitive way to look at this, which would naturally include companies and corporations, which definitely should be included for a number like that. Unless the goal of the number is to incite fear and outrage instead of illustrate and educate. But who would do something like that?
dukeofwulf
442 days ago
The goal was to but a big number in a relatable context. If we're looking for a more fair ratio, that would be debt over GDP. That said, companies and corporations are ultimately owned by (mostly) citizens, so ultimately it comes back to a debt to personal income ratio.
dukeofwulf
442 days ago
Another thing... sure, I feel fear and outrage is appropriate. Our country has a spending problem. Both in government and individually. We can't keep spending at this rate without raising taxes.
benzado
442 days ago
I agree with dukeofwulf, it's about time we raised taxes back up to sustainable levels!
olliejones
441 days ago
Yeh. Big sovereign debt. Due to big sovereign delusion that we can have highways and airports and military adventures without paying for them.
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tante
442 days ago
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Me doing any sort of adult financial stuff.
Oldenburg/Germany
mindspillage
442 days ago
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yep.
Mountain View, California
rclatterbuck
442 days ago
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This! And to an order of magnitude (or so) less extent, car buying.
Covarr
442 days ago
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The average price of a house and the US national debt are both "more than I make in a year".
Moses Lake, WA
alt_text_bot
442 days ago
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I tried converting the prices into pizzas, to put it in more familiar terms, and it just became a hard-to-think-about number of pizzas.
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